Family immigration: a loophole in the law?

| Aug 18, 2017 | Family Immigration |

Immigration has been a hot-button topic in America for years, and even more so in recent months. Although immigration is legal in the country, there also exists a limitation on the number of immigrants allowed in the state. Those offering significant work in the country are also prioritized, depending on the type of service. The tension regarding immigration after a Trump presidency has only grown, especially in California, the state with the most immigrants in the country.

Since the President’s announcement that he would support a bill that would dismantle current immigration processes used by thousands of immigrants and their families, that tension has snowballed. Stricter plans such as these have inspired some to marry immigrants for the sole reason of providing them a green card.

Changing Laws

The Sacramento Bee covers the recent controversy surrounding Trump’s support for a bill that could potentially halve the flow of legal immigrants into the system and prioritize more skilled visa seekers with a merit-based point system. This could pose a threat to immigrants who have yet to master the English language or who have not acquired skills that the country deems valuable. Although analysts predict that the bill will not pass, the outlook for family immigration as a whole does not appear positive when viewed through the lens of this bill.

The Stakes at Hand

The tightening grip on family immigration procedures in America has caused many individuals to seek alternative plans, even if those plans are technically illegal. Forbes comments on the route that many have taken: marrying for the sole reason of receiving a green card. Experts suggest that, of the one million foreign nationals who gain legal status each year, five to fifteen percent may be fraudulent. While this loophole in the law allows thousands of immigrants into the country, it also raises issues in regards to legal marriage procedures, including affidavits of support, liabilities and government-based financial assistance.